The Jeep Attachment, Made For The Campers

When it comes to off-road performance, you can’t go past the Jeep® Wrangler®. But you would never believe me if I told you that you could sleep in the tight metal shell.. Until now… For $36,000 USD.

The Action Camper© has been developed for overlanding and expeditions with two passengers. The interior is incredibly spacious and fitted with all of the amenities to have a comfortable and unforgettable expedition experience to remote areas. The pop-up roof offers in the kitchen area a clearance of 203cm (6’8″). All Dometic S4 windows come with bug screens and blinds. The honeycomb insulated roof allows to install four 100W solar panels (400W total). The roof tent has three vinyl windows; the side windows open and offer bug screens; all three come with detachable privacy covers. The mattresses, seats, backrests, pillows and part of the walls are covered with stylish coloured, cleanable Alcantara.

 

Some great camping spots for 4×4 owners in WA

There’s nothing better than throwing the camping gear in your car and getting away from the city for a couple of days. There are so many amazing places to camp at, and you don’t have to travel for hours on end to get to them. Here are 7 fantastic camp sites near Perth, where you can literally pack on a Friday afternoon, head away and still get a great weekend in.

1. Walyunga

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Walyunga National Park is probably the closest place to Perth where you are allowed to camp in the bush. Located just one hour northeast of Perth, it’s a fantastic spot to check out. I’ve often described this place as a cross between Dwellingup and Serpentine. It has the beautiful Avon river flowing through the National park, a myriad of walking trails, BBQ and picnic facilities and most importantly, a place for you to camp!

You need to book the campsites, which you can do by ringing 9290 6100 and speaking to a ranger. The camp sites are located a few minutes drive away from the main picnic and riverside area, but are in a nice cleared section of bush.

As it is a National Park, day passes apply (unless you have an annual pass). It’s $12 per vehicle. You can find out more about these here. The Camp fees are the usual $7.50 per night.

The wildflowers are spectacular here in season, and with plenty of tracks to walk on you’ll see heaps of them. If you want to know more about the national park, you can read the full post here: Walyunga National Park.

walyunga-national-park-camping

Easy access, with fire rings available.

avon-river-at-walyunga

Walking along the Avon River.

picnic-facilities-at-walyunga

Enjoy a picnic overlooking the river.

walyunga-national-park-bbq

BBQ Facilities available.

wildflowers-at-perth-national-park

Lots of wildflowers around in season.

2. Lane Poole Reserve

An hour and a half south of Perth lies Lane Poole Reserve, just out of Dwellingup. We’ve been going to Lane Poole Reserve every year for a long time now, and always love it. There are 10 different camp sites which vary from huge open areas to more private sites that only house two sets of campers.

The beautiful Murray River runs right through the reserve and is fantastic for swimming, canoeing, white water rafting and fishing.

Fires are permitted when the fire danger is low, and it is a brilliant spot to enjoy a good fire on a cold evening. It does get very cold in the middle of winter, so take your warm gear!

There are plenty of 4WD and mountain bike tracks in the area too.

Again, National Park and camping fee apply. The entry fee is $12 per vehicle unless you have a National Park pass. Camping fee’s range from $7.50 per night to $10, depending on where you stay.

You can read the full post here; Dwellingup. If you want to book a camp site, you can do so here.

dwellingup-murray-river

Fishing in a beautiful part of the Murray River.

murray-river-fog-at-dwellingup

Watching the fog come in on a cold winters morning.

lane-poole-reserve-camping

One of the huge open campsites on a busy weekend.

dwellingup-water-slide

Enjoying the little rock slides.

dwellingup-beauty

What a magic place.

camp-fire-at-dwellingup

A good campfire on a freezing night.

105-series-at-dwellingup

Plenty of 4WD tracks around the place.

3. Waroona Dam

Lake Navarino, or Waroona Dam, has long been a popular place to camp. You can stay at the Holiday park, or take the bush camping option (which we do every time!) and stay nearer the dam itself. Both are booked through Lake Navarino Holiday Park.

Waroona Dam is pretty big, and is well known for skiing and fresh water fishing. There’s also fantastic 4WD tracks around the Dam and plenty of places to relax and soak up the scenery.

Fires are permitted in season, and the camping fees range from $12 to $17 per person per night, depending on where you camp, if its peak season and if you need power or not.

camping-at-waroona

Camping within 50 metres of the Dam.

waroona-dam-skiing

Plenty of room for water skiing and tubing.

waroona-moon-rise

When the wind dies off its a magic place.

waroona-dam-4wd-tracks

Exploring some of the 4WD tracks around the Dam.

waroona-dam-sunset

Sunset over the orange gravel is spectacular.

4. Belvidere

If coastal camping is more your thing, Belvidere is a great little spot we found a few years back. The actual campsite is a few minutes drive back from the beach, tucked in between Leschenault Inlet and Belvidere Beach. At only an hour and 40 minutes away from Perth, it’s easily doable on a Friday afternoon.

The beach here is soft, and you will need a 4WD to drive along it. It’s substantially quieter than Preston and Myalup Beach, but the fishing is just as good.

It’s a DPAW camp site, and the fees are $7.50 per person per night. There is also provision for camper trailer and caravan’s here, and the firewood is usually provided.

If you want to read the full post, you can find it here; Camping at Belvidere.

oztents-at-belvidere

Set up with the Oztents at Belvidere.

belvidere-camp-sites

Your typical camp site at Belvidere.

belvidere-fishing

Belvidere Beach; fishing for salmon.

salmon-fishing-at-belvidere

Lots of opportunity for good fish.

salmon-at-belvidere

We landed several nice salmon.

5. Honeymoon Pool

If you’ve ever seen the Collie River, you’d know it’s a beautiful spot to stop and soak up the scenery. Honeymoon Pool is a DPAW campsite located right on the bank of the river and is 2WD and 4WD accessible. It’s just 2 hours south of Perth and is a stunning part of the world.

The Lennard 4WD track is well worth the drive, but be aware that it does get closed once the rain hits, to avoid substantial damage to the track.

lennard-4wd-track-collie-river

Collie River just off the Lennard 4WD Track

honeymoon-pool-camping

Amazing walks along the Collie River

Honeymoon Pool camping

You can swim, but it gets cold!

6. Martins Tank

An hour and a half south of Perth, 10 minutes drive from the coast lies Martins Tank. It’s another DPAW camp site, set amongst the peppermint trees.

This was done up in 2013 and caters for tents, caravans and camper trailers. Campfires are permitted in season, and fees are $10 per person per night.

This campsite must be booked online in advance, which you can do here.

southern-beaches

Enjoying our own little slice of the beach.

martins-tank-camping

Martins Tank Campsites.

camping-at-martins-tank

Enough shade and the usual facilities.

7. Wellington Dam

The last, but certainly not least camp site near Perth is Wellington Dam. At just over 2 hours south of Perth its a great drive to an even better location. Potters Gorge is the formal DPAW campsite, which has recently been refurbished and caters for a number of campers. This site, however, gets extremely busy very quickly.

If you have a 4WD, there are plenty of other campsites around the dam if you are prepared to do a bit of driving. Even on a popular long weekend, we had no issues finding a handful of good campsites along the banks of Wellington Dam and ended up camping in a beautiful location.

wellington-dam-camping

Could you ask for a better spot?

wellington-dam-4wd-tracks

We’ve had plenty of fun enjoying the 4WD tracks.

sunset-at-wellington-dam

Sunset over the dam; what a way to end the day.

camping-at-wellington-dam

Huge tree’s rustling in the breeze.

Look after these places

It is a huge privilege being able to access these amazing camp sites. Don’t wreck them for everyone else; take your rubbish home, go to the toilets responsibly, have a fire with some common sense (when allowed) and don’t be a muppet.

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Is this Australia’s Best Caravan Park?

Our most recent stay in a caravan park was at the Big 4 Adventure Whitsunday Resort. We had seen all the spectacular photos online and knew that it was rated as one of Australia’s best caravan parks, so we had agreed months ago that it was on our ‘to visit’ list.

We arrived and it was a piece of paradise. Usually we wouldn’t consider staying in a park that was charging over $35 per night, however, this time, we made an exception. The facilities that they had to offer were well and truly worth the extra dollars.

A resort style pool with two waterslides, mini golf, tennis court, badminton, volleyball, two jumping pillows and an animal park – there was plenty to keep us all entertained. If the above facilities weren’t tempting enough, they are currently underway building one of Australia’s biggest resort water parks with 13 slides.

 

Throughout the year, school holidays or not; they run a daily activity schedule. During our 6-night stay, we had fun biscuit decorating, watched two outdoor movies and enjoyed pancakes by the pool for breakfast, all hosted by the resort.

 

Leaving the park was like having those dreaded ‘post-holiday blues’, “do we really have to leave?” is what we asked ourselves. It may not be an officially recognised term but you all know what we are talking about. Now… if that is not a true indication of how much we enjoyed our stay, from people who consider themselves to be on long term holidays; then we’re not sure what else is.

A park that caters for the whole family – we will be back!

Follow: The Pyke Clan

What is your favourite caravan park? Leave a comment below.

7 of the best low cost camp sites in Western Australia

There’s nothing better than throwing the camping gear in your car and getting away from the city for a couple of days. There are so many amazing places to camp at, and you don’t have to travel for hours on end to get to them. Here are 7 fantastic camp sites near Perth, where you can literally pack on a Friday afternoon, head away and still get a great weekend in.

Walyunga

Walyunga National Park is probably the closest place to Perth where you are allowed to camp in the bush. Located just one hour northeast of Perth, it’s a fantastic spot to check out. I’ve often described this place as a cross between Dwellingup and Serpentine. It has the beautiful Avon river flowing through the National park, a myriad of walking trails, BBQ and picnic facilities and most importantly, a place for you to camp!

You need to book the campsites, which you can do by ringing 9290 6100 and speaking to a ranger. The camp sites are located a few minutes drive away from the main picnic and riverside area, but are in a nice cleared section of bush.

As it is a National Park, day passes apply (unless you have an annual pass). It’s $12 per vehicle. You can find out more about these here. The Camp fees are the usual $7.50 per night.

The wildflowers are spectacular here in season, and with plenty of tracks to walk on you’ll see heaps of them. If you want to know more about the national park, you can read the full post here: Walyunga National Park.

walyunga-national-park-camping

Easy access, with fire rings available.

avon-river-at-walyunga

Walking along the Avon River.

picnic-facilities-at-walyunga

Enjoy a picnic overlooking the river.

walyunga-national-park-bbq

BBQ Facilities available.

wildflowers-at-perth-national-park

Lots of wildflowers around in season.

Lane Poole Reserve

An hour and a half south of Perth lies Lane Poole Reserve, just out of Dwellingup. We’ve been going to Lane Poole Reserve every year for a long time now, and always love it. There are 10 different camp sites which vary from huge open areas to more private sites that only house two sets of campers.

The beautiful Murray River runs right through the reserve and is fantastic for swimming, canoeing, white water rafting and fishing.

Fires are permitted when the fire danger is low, and it is a brilliant spot to enjoy a good fire on a cold evening. It does get very cold in the middle of winter, so take your warm gear!

There are plenty of 4WD and mountain bike tracks in the area too.

Again, National Park and camping fees apply. The entry fee is $12 per vehicle unless you have a National Park pass. Camping fee’s range from $7.50 per night to $10, depending on where you stay.

You can read the full post here; Dwellingup. If you want to book a camp site, you can do so here.

dwellingup-murray-river

Fishing in a beautiful part of the Murray River.

murray-river-fog-at-dwellingup

Watching the fog come in on a cold winters morning.

lane-poole-reserve-camping

One of the huge open campsites on a busy weekend.

dwellingup-water-slide

Enjoying the little rock slides.

dwellingup-beauty

What a magic place.

camp-fire-at-dwellingup

A good camp fire on a freezing night.

105-series-at-dwellingup

Plenty of 4WD tracks around the place.

Waroona Dam

Lake Navarino, or Waroona Dam, has long been a popular place to camp. You can stay at the Holiday park, or take the bush camping option (which we do every time!) and stay nearer the dam itself. Both are booked through Lake Navarino Holiday Park.

Waroona Dam is pretty big and is well known for skiing and fresh water fishing. There’s also fantastic 4WD tracks around the Dam and plenty of places to relax and soak up the scenery.

Fires are permitted in season, and the camping fees range from $12 to $17 per person per night, depending on where you camp, if its peak season and if you need power or not.

camping-at-waroona

Camping within 50 metres of the Dam.

waroona-dam-skiing

Plenty of room for water skiing and tubing.

waroona-moon-rise

When the wind dies off its a magic place.

waroona-dam-4wd-tracks

Exploring some of the 4WD tracks around the dam.

waroona-dam-sunset

Sunset over the orange gravel is spectacular.

Belvidere

If coastal camping is more your thing, Belvidere is a great little spot we found a few years back. The actual campsite is a few minutes drive back from the beach, tucked in between Leschenault Inlet and Belvidere Beach. At only an hour and 40 minutes away from Perth, it’s easily doable on a Friday afternoon.

The beach here is soft, and you will need a 4WD to drive along it. It’s substantially quieter than Preston and Myalup Beach, but the fishing is just as good.

It’s a DPAW camp site, and the fees are $7.50 per person per night. There is also provision for camper trailer and caravan’s here, and the firewood is usually provided.

If you want to read the full post, you can find it here; Camping at Belvidere.

oztents-at-belvidere

Set up with the Oztents at Belvidere.

belvidere-camp-sites

Your typical camp site at Belvidere.

belvidere-fishing

Belvidere Beach; fishing for salmon.

salmon-fishing-at-belvidere

Lots of opportunity for good fish.

salmon-at-belvidere

We landed several nice salmon.

Honeymoon Pool

If you’ve ever seen the Collie River, you’d know it’s a beautiful spot to stop and soak up the scenery. Honeymoon Pool is a DPAW campsite located right on the bank of the river and is 2WD and 4WD accessible. It’s just 2 hours south of Perth and is a stunning part of the world.

The Lennard 4WD track is well worth the drive, but be aware that it does get closed once the rain hits, to avoid substantial damage to the track.

lennard-4wd-track-collie-river

Collie River just off the Lennard 4WD Track.

honeymoon-pool-camping

Amazing walks along the Collie River.

Honeymoon Pool camping

You can swim, but it gets cold!

Martins Tank

An hour and a half south of Perth, 10 minutes drive from the coast lies Martins Tank. It’s another DPAW camp site, set amongst the peppermint trees.

This was done up in 2013 and caters for tents, caravans and camper trailers. Campfires are permitted in season, and fees are $10 per person per night.

This campsite must be booked online in advance, which you can do here.

southern-beaches

Enjoying our own little slice of the beach.

martins-tank-camping

Martins Tank Camp sites.

camping-at-martins-tank

Enough shade and the usual facilities.

Wellington Dam

The last, but certainly not least camp site near Perth is Wellington Dam. At just over 2 hours south of Perth its a great drive to an even better location. Potters Gorge is the formal DPAW campsite, which has recently been refurbished and caters for a number of campers. This site, however, gets extremely busy very quickly.

If you have a 4WD, there are plenty of other campsites around the dam if you are prepared to do a bit of driving. Even on a popular long weekend, we had no issues finding a handful of good campsites along the banks of Wellington Dam and ended up camping in a beautiful location.

wellington-dam-camping

Could you ask for a better spot?

wellington-dam-4wd-tracks

We’ve had plenty of fun enjoying the 4WD tracks.

sunset-at-wellington-dam

Sunset over the dam; what a way to end the day.

camping-at-wellington-dam

Huge tree’s rustling in the breeze.

Look after these places

It is a huge privilege being able to access these amazing camp sites. Don’t wreck them for everyone else; take your rubbish home, go to the toilets responsibly, have a fire with some common sense (when allowed) and don’t be a muppet.

7 of the best free camps in Western Australia. Number 3 has amazing views!

There’s nothing better than throwing the camping gear in your car and getting away from the city for a couple of days. There are so many amazing places to camp at, and you don’t have to travel for hours on end to get to them. Here are 7 fantastic camp sites near Perth, where you can literally pack on a Friday afternoon, head away and still get a great weekend in.

1. Walyunga

Walyunga National Park is probably the closest place to Perth where you are allowed to camp in the bush. Located just one hour northeast of Perth, it’s a fantastic spot to check out. I’ve often described this place as a cross between Dwellingup and Serpentine. It has the beautiful Avon river flowing through the National park, a myriad of walking trails, BBQ and picnic facilities and most importantly, a place for you to camp!

You need to book the campsites, which you can do by ringing 9290 6100 and speaking to a ranger. The camp sites are located a few minutes drive away from the main picnic and riverside area, but are in a nice cleared section of bush.

As it is a National Park, day passes apply (unless you have an annual pass). It’s $12 per vehicle. You can find out more about these here. The Camp fees are the usual $7.50 per night.

The wildflowers are spectacular here in season, and with plenty of tracks to walk on you’ll see heaps of them. If you want to know more about the national park, you can read the full post here: Walyunga National Park.

walyunga-national-park-camping

Easy access, with fire rings available.

avon-river-at-walyunga

Walking along the Avon River.

picnic-facilities-at-walyunga

Enjoy a picnic overlooking the river.

walyunga-national-park-bbq

BBQ Facilities available.

wildflowers-at-perth-national-park

Lots of wildflowers around in season.

2. Lane Poole Reserve

An hour and a half south of Perth lies Lane Poole Reserve, just out of Dwellingup. We’ve been going to Lane Poole Reserve every year for a long time now, and always love it. There are 10 different camp sites which vary from huge open areas to more private sites that only house two sets of campers.

The beautiful Murray River runs right through the reserve and is fantastic for swimming, canoeing, white water rafting and fishing.

Fires are permitted when the fire danger is low, and it is a brilliant spot to enjoy a good fire on a cold evening. It does get very cold in the middle of winter, so take your warm gear!

There are plenty of 4WD and mountain bike tracks in the area too.

Again, National Park and camping fee apply. The entry fee is $12 per vehicle unless you have a National Park pass. Camping fee’s range from $7.50 per night to $10, depending on where you stay.

You can read the full post here; Dwellingup. If you want to book a camp site, you can do so here.

dwellingup-murray-river

Fishing in a beautiful part of the Murray River.

murray-river-fog-at-dwellingup

Watching the fog come in on a cold winters morning.

lane-poole-reserve-camping

One of the huge open campsites on a busy weekend.

dwellingup-water-slide

Enjoying the little rock slides.

dwellingup-beauty

What a magic place.

camp-fire-at-dwellingup

A good campfire on a freezing night.

105-series-at-dwellingup

Plenty of 4WD tracks around the place.

3. Waroona Dam

Lake Navarino, or Waroona Dam, has long been a popular place to camp. You can stay at the Holiday park, or take the bush camping option (which we do every time!) and stay nearer the dam itself. Both are booked through Lake Navarino Holiday Park.

Waroona Dam is pretty big, and is well known for skiing and fresh water fishing. There’s also fantastic 4WD tracks around the Dam and plenty of places to relax and soak up the scenery.

Fires are permitted in season, and the camping fees range from $12 to $17 per person per night, depending on where you camp, if its peak season and if you need power or not.

camping-at-waroona

Camping within 50 metres of the Dam.

waroona-dam-skiing

Plenty of room for water skiing and tubing.

waroona-moon-rise

When the wind dies off its a magic place.

waroona-dam-4wd-tracks

Exploring some of the 4WD tracks around the Dam.

waroona-dam-sunset

Sunset over the orange gravel is spectacular.

4. Belvidere

If coastal camping is more your thing, Belvidere is a great little spot we found a few years back. The actual campsite is a few minutes drive back from the beach, tucked in between Leschenault Inlet and Belvidere Beach. At only an hour and 40 minutes away from Perth, it’s easily doable on a Friday afternoon.

The beach here is soft, and you will need a 4WD to drive along it. It’s substantially quieter than Preston and Myalup Beach, but the fishing is just as good.

It’s a DPAW camp site, and the fees are $7.50 per person per night. There is also provision for camper trailer and caravan’s here, and the firewood is usually provided.

If you want to read the full post, you can find it here; Camping at Belvidere.

oztents-at-belvidere

Set up with the Oztents at Belvidere.

belvidere-camp-sites

Your typical camp site at Belvidere.

belvidere-fishing

Belvidere Beach; fishing for salmon.

salmon-fishing-at-belvidere

Lots of opportunity for good fish.

salmon-at-belvidere

We landed several nice salmon.

5. Honeymoon Pool

If you’ve ever seen the Collie River, you’d know it’s a beautiful spot to stop and soak up the scenery. Honeymoon Pool is a DPAW campsite located right on the bank of the river and is 2WD and 4WD accessible. It’s just 2 hours south of Perth and is a stunning part of the world.

The Lennard 4WD track is well worth the drive, but be aware that it does get closed once the rain hits, to avoid substantial damage to the track.

lennard-4wd-track-collie-river

Collie River just off the Lennard 4WD Track

honeymoon-pool-camping

Amazing walks along the Collie River

Honeymoon Pool camping

You can swim, but it gets cold!

6. Martins Tank

An hour and a half south of Perth, 10 minutes drive from the coast lies Martins Tank. It’s another DPAW camp site, set amongst the peppermint trees.

This was done up in 2013 and caters for tents, caravans and camper trailers. Campfires are permitted in season, and fees are $10 per person per night.

This campsite must be booked online in advance, which you can do here.

southern-beaches

Enjoying our own little slice of the beach.

martins-tank-camping

Martins Tank Campsites.

camping-at-martins-tank

Enough shade and the usual facilities.

7. Wellington Dam

The last, but certainly not least camp site near Perth is Wellington Dam. At just over 2 hours south of Perth its a great drive to an even better location. Potters Gorge is the formal DPAW campsite, which has recently been refurbished and caters for a number of campers. This site, however, gets extremely busy very quickly.

If you have a 4WD, there are plenty of other campsites around the dam if you are prepared to do a bit of driving. Even on a popular long weekend, we had no issues finding a handful of good campsites along the banks of Wellington Dam and ended up camping in a beautiful location.

wellington-dam-camping

Could you ask for a better spot?

wellington-dam-4wd-tracks

We’ve had plenty of fun enjoying the 4WD tracks.

sunset-at-wellington-dam

Sunset over the dam; what a way to end the day.

camping-at-wellington-dam

Huge tree’s rustling in the breeze.

Look after these places

It is a huge privilege being able to access these amazing camp sites. Don’t wreck them for everyone else; take your rubbish home, go to the toilets responsibly, have a fire with some common sense (when allowed) and don’t be a muppet.

Follow 4WDing Australia on Facebook: Click Here

Why Free Camping is Better

We’ve been free camping for about 6 years now – all round Oz! It started as a stop gap when travelling huge distances in Western Australia and we didn’t have the energy to continue to drive to the next caravan park. We saw a bunch of RVs and thought we found a Caravan Park that wasn’t on our book.

From this we discovered many benefits of free camping.

It’s free:
Oh duh! That’s why it is called free camping. Personally I like the term “freedom camping” even better! What a great way to offset the cost of travelling especially these huge distances within Australia.

It’s friendly:
Especially if you have rocked up to a popular site, you’re instantly welcomed into the grey nomad set. Popularity is governed generally by the natural beauty of the spot, the ease of parking, accessibility to a nearby town or tourist attraction and/or a toilet. Once in a while you will strike one with free showers and/or maybe even power too! These rare gems are treasured and word gets out and about. So make sure to get there early for a good spot! Pay If there is a donation box there, please make the donation so that there is a good chance these places are still there for others to enjoy. (By the way, to these providers I say a hearty thank you!)
You might even get lucky with an impromptu music sing along

No booking required:
It is great for those that don’t plan their journey too rigourously. You can just pull up when you are ready. No need to stick to an agenda, so if you like a place, you can stay and investigate (within site regulations) and if you don’t like it then you can move on quickly! Another reason why I prefer the term “freedom camping”.
Just rock up when you are ready to stop

It’s easy going:
Most grey nomads are a friendly easy going lot. Who can you complain to if the long drop is rather stinky or the ground is not level. You don’t have to use it or stay there! Frequently there is someone who has started a fire (when allowed) and there’s likely to be a happy hour going somewhere from anytime esp around 4-6pm which are generally open to all comers with smile, or start up your own! Even if you want your own company, you can have that too, just park on the fringes.

Mates around a campfire

Security is what you make it:
This is the toughest part of free camping. Generally both commonsense and experience when camping but in most places campers are a friendly neighbourly bunch. Still we feel more secure if at least one camper joins us at a free camp. Having said that, we’ve never had a single negative experience in terms of security. However I would say trust your instincts or you’re in for a long night. We will stop at a free camp where there are no other campers, usually by 2pm. Sometimes it just take one to stop and others travelling by might decide to stop there too now that someone has stopped first. If no one else has stopped to join us by 4pm then we might move on to the next place that has some people. Again trust your instincts! Take photos of other campers esp their rigs and number plates if you like. (It is easy to delete them the next morning when you wake up.) Don’t forget to lock your doors. Security is what you make it!
Usually Pet friendly:
Another advantage of free camping is that your fur baby is welcome too. They are usually prohibited in National Parks and some council sites. In order to maintain this privilege please keep your dog on a lead if required; or if other people, wildlife or stock are around – and for goodness stake, please pick up their droppings!
A gorgeous staffy kept on a lead

Do your research:
Do you have enough power, water and food for the duration of your camp? Not all places welcome genies and fires. Don’t forget your toilet. If you need to go bush toilet, then take a shovel or even a garden spade and hide the evidence including toilet paper and go a long away from the populated areas.

Aussie True Blue Bush toilet!

or a bring your own toilet

Free camping at Genoa

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The Genoa Rest Area is on the banks of the Genoa River in Eastern Gippsland, Victoria. As a donation is requested for upkeep, it officially is not quite free camping but it is certainly a low cost alternative that is well worth stopping for upto the 72 hours that is allowed. I love to support the services that are offered at camps like these and happily give my donation.

It is a disused caravan park on the old highway with a large flat and grassy campsite with a few trees to watch or the passing traffic on the new highway which you can still see across the way.

There is a great playground for the kiddies at one end of the park surrounded by lots of well kept grassy areas. You can hear lots of bell birds but we didn’t actually catch a glimpse of them whilst we were there.

 

It is pleasant to go for little walks to the old wooden truss bridge (that also leads to the pub) or down to the sandy river which is quite shallow at the moment but apparently can rise very quickly in the rains.

Mallacoota.

On our second day there we went for a drive to Mallacoota. There’s a huge caravan camping park right on the sea front, which apparently is the largest caravan park in the Southern Hemsipshere.It would be a rather a grand place to camp and apparently it can be absolutely crowded with campers come high season. The prices are quite reasonable and grade according to off season, shoulder and peak with prices reflecting that.

When very full, it mean everyone would be packed in like sardines where the power points are and the majority of sites are not level so make sure to bring some blocks. It is in a grand location between river flats and the ocean and extremely popular for those with boats, so I guess that means for fishing too!

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Cann River Rainforest Caravan Park

The Cann River Rainforest Caravan Park is a partly shaded caravan park on the south bank of the Cann River. It is within easy walking distance to the local pub and shops. The fuel prices here beat those of surrounding towns by 5-10cents a litre. The town has 4 cafe/coffee shops plus 2 bakeries and a general store which also has fishing, hardware, plumbing gear some of which Rob commented he has never seen before!

Effectively we were free camping in the town of Cann River. We chatted to people as one does and found that the caravan park at Cann River was without a manager for a short while and thus stays there were available for free.

Originally we were only going to stay 2 nights but we decided to stay an extra night as we were enjoying the company of our neighbours. We had a terrific happy hour complete with a mini sing a long.

Rob even ran into a guy, Dolf, he hasn’t seen for 40 years. We even found out he lives just about 15-20km away from us.
Blog written by: RobbieBargo Rv Travels

Free camping on the Snowy River

We drove into Orbost around 2pm where we went shopping then headed for a free camp out the Marlo Road, free camping beside the Snowy River.

The Snowy River runs into the sea nearby at Marlo. There are several free-camps right on the banks of the Snowy River just south of Orbost and north (west) of Marlo from which you can free camp, fish or even launch a kayak.

We have a fantastic spot right on the river which we are sharing with a bout 6 other campers. The local council even encourage free camping here for 48 hours. They even mow the camp grounds. Our camp (the one closest to Marlo) has a small fishing jetty which was popular even with the locals. We had one returned local fishing at the same time as a camper and one caught maybe 6 mallet however the other guy caught nothing. (We are like the unlucky fisherman, we just don’t seem to have the knack!)

We camped just 3m from the water. What a wonderful place to sit and watch the waters pass by. The only drawback is that it is alongside the only road between Orbost and Marlo and surprisingly quite busy, well busy enough to make it not a peaceful camp.

From this camp ground we took a couple of trips leaving the motorhome behind to Cape Conran and Marlo where the Snowy River actually runs into the sea. We also did our grocery shopping in Orbost and I can highly recommend the sausage rolls at the bakery in the middle of the main street!
We enjoyed sitting at the tables under the trees watching the world go by.

We were totally fascinated with the white eyes of this dog.

 

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