Helpful tips for buying a tent

Buying a tent can be a daunting process. It isn’t easy, and it’s ideal that you do some research on what tent would best suit you before you go the store or buy it online. To make things a bit easier, Campersway has come up with some quick tips when deciding what type of tent to you and your family should go with before you camp.

How many people will be sleeping in the tent?

First things first, you need to find out how many people will be sleeping in the tent. A tents size can be quite deceiving as well, when a tent says it is a ‘four-person tent’, It means it will fit four people at a maximum. Realistically, A four-person tent can comfortably fit 2 people with beds and bags, or maybe 3. If you’re after a tent to fit a family of four, a six-person is probably the best fit. If there are any more than 4 people, you might have to look further than a six-person tent.

You need to take into consideration what you will need space for, whether it’s storage or bedding. You might think that a four-person tent looks massive when it’s empty, but once you start filling it out, you run out of room very quickly.

What conditions will the tent be used in?

Not all tents can be used in every weather condition.

For hot, summer weather, a lightweight tent with heaps of ventilation that is not designed to withhold rain and wind would be perfect. A three-season tent is perfect if you are camping in both winter and summer. It will be more likely to survivor heavier rain and winds, as well as provide protection from the cold weather.

Winter tents are not too common in Australia, as our conditions are milder in winter. But if you are planning on camping in snowy conditions, you will definitely need a winter tent – not a three season tent. Shop carefully to get the right tent to suit the weather you will be camping in.

How much will the tent weigh?

Some tents can be extremely heavy, so if you need to carry it a long distance, make sure get a smaller one.

Some of the larger tents are extremely heavy to carry, even if it’s just from the car to the campsite. Some family tents are so large when packed up in their bags, you won’t even be able to fit them on the roof racks.

So check that out before you commit to purchase. Whilst weight for car camping is not as big as a consideration as weight when you are hiking, You really need to look at your own capabilities and whether or not you will be comfortable moving that tent around.

How easy is it to set up?

How many times have you walked into a camping store, see a big, massive tent, with lots of room and storage area, and it sleeps ten people! However good this tent looks, you need to think about how long it took the camping store staff to set up.

You don’t want to spend hours on end upon arriving at a campsite on setting up a complicated tent, so you need to consider ease of setting up when selecting a tent.

Remember as well, the bigger the tent, the bigger are you will need to set it up, so make sure the area you are going to can accommodate larger tents.

Hopefully, that helps If you are looking for what tent you should buy. I would also recommend going into your local camp store and asking the staff. They know best when it comes to tents, they are the experts for a reason, and they can help select a tent personally suited to your situation.

Family Camping Checklist

Family Camping Checklist

Make sure you never leave anything off the checklist when packing to go away camping with your family with Campersway handy family camping checklist.

It can sometimes be tough trying to remember what you need to take camping when you’ve got your hand full with the rest of the family, So Campersway has made a print out list to make sure you never forget anything again.

Click here for a print out PDF Version

However, if you can’t open that, the list is below.

Campsite Gear

  • Tent, Pole, Stakes
  • Mallet
  • Cover for under your tent
  • Extra Tarp
  • Sleeping Bag
  • Sleeping Mat
  • Pillows
  • Repair Kit
  • Extra Blankets
  • Headlights and Flashlights
  • Lantern
  • Batteries
  • Shovel
  • Camp Chair

Cooking

  • Stove
  • Fuel for Stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Firewood
  • Frying Pan
  • Pot
  • Corkscrew
  • Tablecloth
  • Roasting Sticks
  • Food Storage
  • Esky
  • Ice
  • Water Bottles
  • Plates and Utensils
  • Cups and Mugs
  • Knife and Spatula
  • Cutting Board
  • Foil
  • Soap
  • Sponge
  • Dishtowel
  • Paper Towel

Clothes

  • Clothes for Daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimming Gear
  • Rainwear
  • Jacket
  • Extra layers for warmth (Thermals)
  • Gloves
  • Hats
  • Beanie
  • Socks
  • Shoes (hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes)

Personal Items

  • Toothbrush
  • Insect Repellent
  • Sunscreen
  • First-aid Kit
  • Medicine
  • Toliteres
  • Toilet Paper
  • Soap
  • Towel

Other

  • Phone Charger
  • Maps
  • Garbags
  • Firestarters
  • Firewood
  • Beer and Wine

Conversation Reignites Over Uluru After Another Death

Written by avid camper – Rhys De Deugd

One of the great wonders of the world is Uluru, and for years it has been affirmed by Indigenous Australians as a sight of tradition, history, and importance, and not a rock that is to be climbed.

To the Anangu people, the sacred site has held much significance and many of the traditional owners say the rock holds many stories.

The stories are passed down generations and its sacred nature is exemplified by its beauty and importance to so many Australians.

With the recent news of a Japanese tourist dying after falling whilst climbing the rock, it has again sparked the conversation of whether the beautiful rock should be banned from climbing for safety and indigenous traditional reasons.

Northern Territory Police say the man, 76, was attempting to ascend one of the steepest parts of the climb when he collapsed and lost consciousness about 4:00 pm yesterday.

advertisement: Over 1,500 campsites Australia wide

The climb is extremely dangerous with over 37 people dying since the 1950’s when tourism began to come to central Australia.

The Anangu believe that in the beginning, the world was unformed and featureless, Uluru played a part in creating all beings and features.

Uluru is the physical evidence of the feats performed by ancestral beings during this creation time.

However, for many travellers there has been motivation to tick-off an item on their bucket list as they may not have the opportunity to achieve the feat that many other tourists have done.

Many may have climbed it but also many have lived in central Australia for thousands of years before us and are the traditional and spiritual owners of the land.

At this stage, it appears a ban will be taking place next year after the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park board decided unanimously to ban climbing Uluru.

Regardless, it is one of the true beauties of nature and is still a great tourist attraction from the bottom and the top.

Have your say below in the comments

The Pyke Clan in a Caravan on Campersway

How much does it cost to go around Australia

How much does it cost to go around Australia

Ever wondered how much it cost to go around Australia? The Pyke Clan in a Van have narrowed down the exact amount of money you need to take a year off and travel our beautiful country.

To find more unique campsites you can search here

 12 MONTHS ON THE ROAD 

We’ve spent $35,919.20 in total. 
 Includes gas bottles, rego, phone bills, insurances etc.
= $690.75 per week

The total grocery bill is $7,205.77 
= $138.57 per week

We’ve visited 5 states so far. 
 Tom’s Favourite State – Tasmania
 Mikaela’s Favourite State- Northern Territory

Travelled 35,970 km’s.

Most we’ve paid for diesel – $2.50/L

Total fuel bill is $6,833.13
= $131.40 per week

We’ve had one baby 
 Welcome to the Clan Milla

Visited 124 playgrounds. 

Collected 61 stubby holders. 

We’ve gone through 8 pairs of thongs.
•Leaderboard•
 (3) Kane , Lucas
 (2) Tom
 (0) Mikaela, Milla

Join our Facebook group. The Caravan, Camping and Glamping Group!

We’ve had 1 flat tyre. 

Car servicing costs – $1368

We’ve had our towing mirrors and our Caravan stone guard stolen. 

We’ve replaced one Caravan door handle, one TV antenna handle, one 12V TV, two solar panels, one toilet pump, one cracked water pipe and our awning. 

Caravan costs – $3,560

We’ve stayed at 206 free camps. 
 Favourite free camp – Cosy Corner North in Binalong Bay, Tasmania 

We’ve stayed in 159 Caravan Parks. 
 Favourite Caravan Park – BIG4 Adventure Whitsunday Resort

Total accommodation bill is $5,602.35
=$107.73 per week

Most-played driving song – Ride With Me by Nelly (boys know it as “the money song”)

Total activities bill is $2,124.25
 Tom’s Highlights – Wineglass BayThe Daintree Rainforest
 Mikaela’s Highlights – West MacDonnell RangesGreat Barrier Reef Marine ParkUluru
 Kane’s Highlights – Gold Coast Theme Parks, all the water slides
 Lucas’ Highlights – Australia Zoo, all the playgrounds

Favourite Pub – Daly Waters Historic Pub

Total alcohol bill is $1602.43

A few essentials that make caravanning a lot easier –
 Our washing machine (saves us so much money!)
 12V fans (makes free camping a lot more comfortable!)
 Our Waeco (thank goodness for extra freezer space and cold beer) 

Families we have met along the way
 Mountain Sun Sea, The Blizzards’ Big Lap, Rogers Great Escape, Sunset Seekers, Aussie Wanderlust (plus a few more who don’t have FB pages) 

We’ve seen more then what we ever thought was possible. Australia truly is an amazingly diverse, beautiful country. 

There’s been campfires, red dirt, blue skies, waterfalls, sunsets and sand in our toes.

We’ve watched as our kids flourish becoming independent, knowledgeable, adventurous little boys. 

Our marriage has gone from strength to strength. 

We’ve shared a drink and a laugh with so many new friends. 

A LIFETIME OF MEMORIES ‍‍‍

And there’s still so much left to see and do —No regrets

Follow the Pyke Clan in a Caravan on Facebook!

They quit their jobs, joined a carnival and explored Australia

I’ve been enrolled in University for 7 years and have attended for 3 and a half years, the other 3 and a half years I’ve been travelling the world. 12 months ago now, my partner asked if I was willing to quit my job, put off University for another year (which wasn’t unusual for me) and take the time to see our own country. I’d seen 27 countries but had never been outside of Victoria or NSW. The answer to his question was a no-brainer. So that’s exactly what we did; we quit our jobs, said our farewells and began travelling Australia.

When we began our life on the road, we said we would take 5 months to see Australia, clearly having no idea how big this insane country is. Majority of people’s responses were, ‘If it doesn’t work, you can always come home’. In our minds, it was never not going to work. 5 months turned into 8, and 8 turned into 12. Life on the road has been the best thing we’ve ever done, alongside joining the carnival and meeting such incredible people from all across Australia and the world. We’ve lived in a space the size of 1.5m x 2m for the past 12 months and never once have we felt trapped, crammed or regretful of leaving our lives back home.
We’ve driven over 56,000kms in our babies Maxy and Larry (our Van and Land Cruiser) and it’s been such an adventure that neither one of us will ever forget. To so many people, living out of a car would be their worst nightmare, to me, their insane.
Before living on the road, I lived in a 5 bedroom home which consisted of 6 TVs and 4 people; you do the math? It didn’t take me long to question, why do we have all of these material objects in our life when all we need is a car, a road, a map and each other? (Oh and some money helps too!). My point is, you can have all the material possessions you want in your life and still be unhappy, or you can live your life on the road for a while, see these incredible places Australia has to offer and I’m certain that you’ll find a level of happiness you’ve never come across before.

 

56,000+kms in 310 days.
$26,000 spent;
$600 on caravan parks
$100 on National Parks
Can’t even think about the $$ spent on fuel.
3 flights.
2 cars.
2 car breakdowns (stupid choke!).
0 flat tyres (How? It’s beyond me?).
1 fight.
2 hospital visits.
0 accidents.
2 birds hit (R.I.P).
47 degrees was the hottest.
5 degrees was the coldest.
Cheapest meal: $1 for 12 dim sims.
Most costly meal: $200 seafood feast.
Most memorable comment: “Slow down you cockhead!”.
Top 10 spots in Australia:
– Whitsundays (QLD)
– Coolangatta (QLD)
– Uluru (NT)
– Kings Canyon (NT)
– Lucky Bay (Esperance, WA)
– Karijini National Park (WA)
– Wallaman falls (QLD)
– Broome (WA)
– Litchfield National Park (NT)
– Great Ocean Road (VIC)

 

I’ve always been a Gypsie at heart, and now I’ve found my Gypsie man. You learn so much about yourself and each other when you both only have one another. I always say, if we can survive living in a car for 12 months, we can survive anything. It’s now time to go home for Christmas and switch our life on the road from full time to part time; that’s until we get bored and find a new adventure anyway.

If you’re sitting on the fence trying to decide if life on the road is suited for you or even if you’re already on the road, head to www.girlmeetsboymeetsvan.com to check out some entertaining stories of our life on the road or even if you need some visual motivation as to why you should hit the road or places to add to the bucket list, head to @girlmeetsboymeetsvan on Instagram.

8 Tips You Must Know When Camping With Dogs – Campersway

We have our dog Pippy Perry alongside us for the journey – is she a pain? Nope – Andrew is much more trouble than Pip will ever be! We did consider finding her a temporary home but we are gone indefinitely and the thought of not seeing her for a few years was just too upsetting to even think about!

Our advice before you set off on a big trip;

1. Have dog poo bags EVERYWHERE – in the car, your wallet, caravan, handbag. If your dog does do a No.2 PICK it up! If you don’t every other camper will judge you (myself included) & there is nothing worse than treading in it!

2. Bulk pigs ears – our Pip will take approximately 1hr to get through one.

3. A good sturdy water bowl – not the collapsible ones, they become unstable after a few weeks.

4. A few dogs leads & a proper walking harness – we have a lead in the car & on in the caravan.

5. Have a copy of your dog’s vaccinations in the glove box just in case it needs to go in a kennel in an emergency, in a pinch you can always get a copy faxed to you from your vet!

6. Make sure the mirco-chip is up to date!

7. Exercise your dog! Pip goes on at least one walk a day (over 3kms – usually 5kms) not only is it great for me & Pip but we meet so many lovely people locally and also those staying in the same place as you.

8. Where will you stay? Get WIKICAMPS – have the ‘dogs allowed’ filter on! Follow other travelling families/couples who have taken their dog on Facebook & Instagram, see where they are staying! I look up the #travelaustraliawithdogs

Get to know your dog;Are they ok on a lead? They spend a lot of time on the lead when you are on the road – do they carry on like a pork chop when they see other dogs? Knowing all their quirks make life so much easier!

  • Will they be happy to be left on their own for short periods? Can they handle being on their own if you all go to the shower block at the same time? Or if you all go to the camp kitchen for dinner together? Or are they barkers?
  • What are they like near water? Pippy will run & jump off a jetty quicker than you can say ‘croc’ – so she is on a lead before we open the car doors! Good to know in advance!
  • Do they come when they are called? Our Pip is very obedient but I have seen a few grey nomads chasing fluffy white dogs around caravan parks – it’s a bit cute to watch but probably not so cute if you’re the one doing the chasing!
  • Do they get car sick? Pip doesn’t but it seems to be surprisingly common for dogs!

 

The most common question we are asked……

What do you do with her when you go site seeing or to national parks?

We take Pippy almost everywhere & know her very well – she is happy to sit under a tree eating her pig’s ear while we swim in the pool etc. And remember when I said you meet lovely people when you walk your dog in the morning? Most people are happy to babysit your dog in exchange for you babysitting theirs. We have even had people travelling without their dog offering to mind Pippy because they miss their own pooch so much! Most Dog-friendly caravan parks are able to give you advice on local dog sitters, alternatively, there are dog kennels for overnight/longer stays.

We don’t regret bringing Pippy with us – not for one second!

Follow us on Instagram & Facebook @milsypezwardo #milsypezwardo. I’ll be posting regularly about how we find work, distance education, what essentials we brought along, caravan/troopy mods & camp sites!

Don’t be shy to leave a comment below or message us with any questions or with your hot tips of your own that might help us along the way J


5 aussie travel apps

Since our last post, that being our 12 month budget update – we have had a lot of people message and ask about how we keep track and what Apps we use so we have compiled our top 5.

👮 Fuel Map Australia
➖ Particularly since leaving the East Coast, this has been awesome! We can plan ahead. Diesel can be up to 40c cheaper just 20km’s down the road. The savings are better in our pocket! 👮

👮 Google Maps
➖ A fair few people asked who we made the map through.

👮 Gas Finder
➖ Because why pay more then you have to? Generally we just use the Swap N Go at Bunnings for $19.95. But if that’s not available…. this app comes in handy. We were once stung $60 for a bottle…. ummmm…. never again!

👮 WikiCamps
➖ The best $8.99 we’ve spent for the trip and lots of people will already know about it…. but if you don’t, go buy it! It shows free camps, low paid camps, caravan parks, dump points, drinking water taps, points of interest etc within the area. Choose a filter and you get the whole rundown with prices, reviews and recent photos – not just the ‘professional’ ones that parks get done up. Nothing worse then turning up and it looks nothing like their website!! 🗻

👮 Pocket Expense
➖ This is what we use to keep track of our money. You can make your own categories so…. ‘Groceries’, ‘Diesel’, ‘Accommodation’ etc. and then we just log it in as we buy things. So no, I don’t spend hours going through our bank statements to work out how much we’ve spent! ☺️

Free Camp Versus Caravan Parks – what is better?

The majority of comments and feedback we get are positive but occasionally we get comments regarding free camping and “taking money away from Caravan Parks”

Caravan parks are no different from any other business- they offer a service and if people want that service they pay for it. Before our trip we spent our money to become self contained. This allows far greater flexibility where we stop for the night.

This is very important when travelling with young kids because when they have had enough travelling, they are very vocal letting us know! When we do pay for campsites such as national parks and farm stays we rarely use the amenities provided, but instead are paying for the location.

We also like to have more space around us than most caravan parks provide. We always try to leave a site cleaner than we found it and the last job before we hit the rd each day is an emu bob which our kids have turned into a competition.

Growing up in Tassie my dad used to take us camping ‘a lot’ and I dont remember ever having stayed in a caravan park. Even though our tent has wheels and all the amenities of a house l see no reason my kids shouldnt grow up with the same memories of sitting around a camp fire, roasting marshmallows or cooking damper, while looking up at the stars with not another person within cooee.

Everyone has their own journey and this is ours. Life is what you make it. We are able to travel our lap by keeping to a cheaper accommodation budget. It works for us 🙂

-Gibbo

Free Camping at Lake Argyle

The best free camp we’ve had on our whole trip when it comes to views 😍

Set on the river with a mountain backdrop the views were absolutely 💯%. After we started to to set up our camp a couple of girls arrived in their 2wd van and managed to get stuck in the softer sand. Axl and Gibbo jumped at the chance to help out the beautiful Swedish girls. #mazdabt50 #totherescue. We had the most peaceful sleep. I don’t think I heard any noise other than the flowing river. Each morning Gibbo braved going for a bit of a fish while keeping a keen out for crocs that can be found in the river. We left the van parked up and day tripped to the lake where we all had a great time stand up paddle boarding and had a quick dip in the infinity pool. The huge Dam Wall was also a fantastic sight to see.
We intended on staying just one night but 3 days later we packed up due to the bushfire across the river. We loved this free camp and absolutely recommend to ALL!!!
What a way to finish our WA adventure!!

#FANTASTIC #thatview #onedayweshould #travelaustraliawithkids #aussieoutback #thisiswa #justanotherdayinwa #wikicamps #freecamps #10/10 #thebest #camping #caravanning #lakeargyle #lakeargylecruises #standuppaddleboard #bushfire

***FOLLOW ONEDAYWESHOULD ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM FOR MORE FREECAMPS and travelling with kids info, tips, tricks, pics and more!!!***

 

8 must do’s on the Eyre Peninsula

1.Talia Caves tourist drive South Australia
(just a short drive from Venus Bay)


We drove straight past this place initially as we weren’t sure if the road was suitable for us towing our 3 tonne van! In short- Definitely YES the road is suitable for those towing large vans and Definitely YES you need to stop in there! 😱 HOLY WOW. this place was incredible!

2.Murphy’s Haystacks- Eyre Peninsula SA

After a quick 2km detour off the highway. No hay anywhere to be found BUT we did find some amazing Granite boulders 😜

I think these were the highlight of Axls trip so far. We read the book ‘Are we there yet’ (about a family travelling around Australia) and these boulders are in it. So we planned to stop in and check them out. The kids ran around like crazy! So hyper and excited, climbing all over them and just loving every second! These Huge boulders are just beautiful 😍 cost $5/family to visit and the option of $10 extra if you’d like to park up for the night!

3. Pildappa Rock Camping Area (South Australia’s ‘#waverock’)

This was our first little venture inland as we’ve spent the rest of our time sticking to the coastal routes. I was worried about trekking us all inland 125kms from Port Kenny, South Australia just to see a rock that I hadn’t really heard that much about (Just seen some great reviews on WikiCamps). Well it didn’t disappoint. The kids had a ball playing on the rock with their #TonkaTrucks, walking and riding their bikes around the huge rock and climbing on top (that bit not so enjoyable for me.. freaking out having all 3 kids up there 😬😱 😰). A fantastic place to visit and a really peaceful night’s sleep there too👌#winning

4.Venus Bay – Eyre Peninsula SA

If you’re after a mix of stunning coast lines similar to GOR mixed with beautiful bays, a unique curved jetty and the most magnificent colourings in the water visit Venus Bay!

When driving into the town you get to Bay Road- if you turn left you’ll end up at a lookout overlooking stunning cliffs. If you turn right you’ll end up at a beautiful curving jetty. The jetty becomes even more magnificent when you take the time to walk along it. The colours in the water are absolutely magnificent. So many different shades of blues and greens 👌. A bonus for us was the great Playground at the start of the jetty. It’s always nice to find a fun playground to let the kids run around. There’s something for everyone in Venus Bay 😍👌

5.The #INTENSE Whistling rocks and the Blowholes (Cape Bauer Loop Drive  Streaky Bay, South Australia, Australia)

We went for a drive along the Cape Bauer Rd (loops around the coast and back to streaky) *the road is fine for those towing.

First we stopped at Cape Bauer a nice scenic lookout. Second stop was at whistling rocks and the Blowholes. We started walking along the boardwalk heading towards the sites. As soon as we climbed the brow of the hill we started hearing the intense sound of the whistling rocks. The waves force air and water through holes in the rocks, towards the cliff surface, giving us the sound of whistling rocks. I tried to capture a video of this happening but you really can’t get the same intense feeling from watching it on film. It was crazy, exciting and even a little bit frightening. This really is something you’ll have to go and experience first hand.

Unfortunately for us the tide was too far out to see the Blowholes blowing… Something to keep in mind if travelling out there to see it.

6.Coffin Bay National Park

An unexpected extended stay in the Port Lincoln area lead us to explore the National Park in Coffin Bay. For a National Park we never intended to look through. We ended up staying 4 nights and loved it! Cost $12/night to camp (plus National Park fees)

Fun filled days of driving around the coastline and through the rugged bush tracks. Playing on the sand dunes. Fishing and actually catching fish!!! Friendly roos coming to our door, emus and their babies wondering around the campgrounds. Great walking tracks and the highlight being were pretty much the only ones here except for another travelling family with kids the same age 😍.

Kids had the best of times playing together. I must admit we rather enjoyed our time spent with these guys too. Extra bonus as It’s always great having others to go 4WD exploring with.. just incase 👌

I would absolutely love to come back to this place when it’s warmer. The perfectly blue ocean water with stunning white sandy beaches was so worth the hour and half 4×4 drive! It almost made me want to dip my toes in… almost. The freezing icy winds made me think twice pretty quickly! Instead we lit a fire and watched the boys catch some fish. #onedayweshould come back! Would be amazing in summer 😍

7. Mikkira Station

Picture driving down the road and seeing stunning farmland and white sand dunes in the distance… A sheep or 2 a k-kangaroo. (Yep I went there). This very Aussie ‘Mikkira Station’ had nearly everything. Wild emus, tonnes of Kangaroos and a Koala 🐨 up nearly every tree in the campsite. After just a short walk you’ll find beautiful historic sites and buildings you can even enter . There’s a real toilet and a hot shower for those who need.

This place was well and truly worth the $25/night pricetag. A fantastic place for a true blue Aussie outback experience and only 25mins from Port Lincoln!

8. Point Lowly and Whyalla, South Australia, Australia

Point Lowly Camping Area $8/ night maximum stay 4 weeks.

We found a great little spot with stunning views to park up our van for a couple of nights and who else would pull up beside us? Another friendly Tasmanian! Small world! 🌏

We drove into Whyalla (my place of birth) to have a look around. Whyalla was much smaller and much more industrial than I had pictured but had some nice views and an interesting history.

Upon arriving back to our campsite we were surprised to find a dolphin 🐬 swimming in the water right near our campsite 😍

A couple of other quick stops on the Eyre Peninsula SA worth a mention-

*Camping at Perlubie Beach (near Streaky Bay)

*Sculptures on a cliff top tourist drive in Elliston  – (this drive is suitable for those towing)

*Seal colony at Point Labatt Conservation Park (very hard to see. They blend in with the rocks. take binoculars if you have them!)

*Streaky Bay Jetty (millions of small fish at the end of the jetty, a few jellyfish and a couple dolphins)

*Port Lincoln a fantastic place to chill out and the bonus for us being the 2 large supermarkets (to stock up ready for our journey across the Nullarbor)

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