16 Travel Apps for your Big Lap around Australia

 

Before you take off on an epic tour around Australia, be sure to download the Best Travel Apps on the market. There is already so much you need to consider before you set off on your Big Lap. Here is a list of apps to help make your journey safer, smoother, and more fun! Written by: Mountain Sun Sea

Campsite Apps

You may have a hard copy of the Australian campsites from Camps Australia Wide 8 (Camps Australia Wide 9 is due in February 2017) – be sure to download both the Camps Australia Wide and Wikicamps apps.

  1. Camps Australia Wide is $7.99 to download but it contains indispensable information about campsites in addition to photographs of listings from both the Camps Australia Wide guide as well as the Caravan Parks Australia Wide guide.

camps8

Camps Australia Wide – Android

Camps Australia Wide – iTunes

  1. Wikicamps basic version is free, but the full version can be downloaded for a small one-time fee of $7.99 that will grant you access to the app for a lifetime. Wikicamps is a user generated database which is kept up-to-date with the latest information. It works completely offline so you don’t have to worry about signal or a wifi connection.

You just simply download all the content you need to your device before you go! You will find information about free and paid campsites and whether they are accessible for caravans or camper trailers. It shows you where there are caravan parks, road side rest areas, public dump points and much more! Wikicamps uses your location to show you nearby points of interest so you won’t miss anything cool on your journey.

wikicamps

Wikicamps Australia – iTunes

Wikicamps Australia – Android

 

Tracking Apps

  1. TrackMyTour is great for keeping family members up-to-date on your location. This app uses GPS tracking to make it easy for you to highlight places on your trip and send photos or other fun updates to loved ones at home. It’s a great app for travel in terms of keeping in touch with friends and family. The TrackMyTour app and website are free to use, but you are restricted to the number of maps. If you wish to create more maps you can then purchase an upgrade from within the app. TrackMyTour is only compatible on iTunes.

trackmytour                    trackmytrip

TrackMyTour – iTunes

The android version is called TrackMyTrip

  1. HemaExplorer – 4WD Maps costs $29.99. This app also uses GPS tracking and it literally follows the exact roads you drive. You do need to purchase maps as they only provide the most basic maps. You can upgrade to HEMA Offline for $99.99 if you are looking at navigating over extremely remote areas, with a real-time offline GPS tracking system and claims to have Australia’s best topographic mapping.

hema

Hema Explorer – Australia – iTunes

Hema Explorer – Australia – Android

WikiCamps also allows you plan your trip and if you need to – move each place as you travel. You can also view your route to help you find and plan other stops along the way. (See link above).

Budgeting Apps

  1. Track-Every-Coin is an app designed for tracking expenses in daily life as well as while traveling. It’s free for download just like you’d expect from a good expense tracker and is a very popular app for travellers.

trackeverycoin

Trail Wallet is a travel budget app designed for iPhones or iPads. It’s free for the first 25 items you track, but then you have to pay to use it.

You could also use Expedition Australia Budget Tracking spreadsheet, hardcopy, or just a book to keep track of your travel expenses.

Fuel App

  1. Fuel Map is a user generated database where the information is added and edited by users showing petrol stations and fuel prices. This app keeps the travellers around Australians in-the-know about the cost of petrol throughout the country.

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Fuel Map – iTunes

Fuel Map – Android

Weather Apps

 To keep track of inclement weather conditions en-route to your destination!

  1. Bureau of Meteorology
  1. Weatherzone

weatherzone

Reminder Apps

Use these reminder apps to remember all the important dates and times like when to re-register your car and caravan. It’s easy to lose track of important dates when on the road day-after-day!

  1. Due – iTunes for your iPhone or iPad and E-Reminder for Android

First Aid App

  1. The Red Cross First Aid app is free and it offers access to life-saving information in an emergency.

The Red Cross First Aid app is great to have in addition to your first aid kit.

first-aid

Education Apps

  1. Australian Wildflowers is an essential field guide with more than 70 of the most common species of wildflowers found in our beautiful country! This app will assist you in quickly identifying flowering plants and is a highly valuable reference tool in all locations. This app is well structured and easy to navigate. Perfect for field guides that use picture recognition where every flower in Australian Wildflowers is described in detail showing information about its structure, location, common name, scientific name, botanical family and flowering time. You get all this information with no internet connection – and all images and information is available in real time. Australian Wildflowers is currently only available on iTunes.

aust-wildflower

Australian Wildflowers – iTunes

  1. Michael Morcombe’s Field Guide to Australian Birds app has been called the most comprehensive field guide to Australian birds available in the market today It is complimented by the eGuide featuring an extensive and detailed descriptions of almost all bird species including songs and calls, measurements and breeding behaviour.

The app allows you to save your sightings to a list to include the date and location with room for notes. There is a free ‘lite’ version of the app, but it only lists a handful of the 790 species that the full version has.

Michael Morcombe’s Field Guide to Australian Birds – iTunes Cost is $29.99

Michael Morcombe’s Field Guide to Australian Birds – Android Cost is $28.60

  1. Snakes of Australia is a great app to compliment the First Aid app. Snakes of Australia is a comprehensive electronic field guide of 167 species of Australian snakes. Detailing species profiles including photos, distribution maps, description of key characters, danger rating, similar species, conservation, etymology, pronunciation and more. The great part about this app is the introductory chapters on key aspects of identifying snakes, snake venoms and first aid, and snake biology. No network connection is needed when using this app.

The scale count feature is very handy as is the “filter by location” function cross-checks your location (via iPhone GPS) and shows you only snakes that are likely to occur within your area. This app is currently only available on iTunes

snakes

Snakes of Australia – iTunes Cost is $9.99

  1. Australia is home to many of the world’s most venomous snakes, spiders and marine animals. The free Australian Bites and Stings is an app providing education to our Australian community and will be of use to anyone planning to be out in Australia’s great outdoors – whether it be on the beach, camping, bushwalking or just playing out in a back yard!

A recent study found that despite the vast array of venomous creatures in Australia, the majority of people don’t know what to do if they’re unfortunate enough to be bitten or stung by one. This app is a must have if you are travelling with young children and is also a great compliment to the First Aid app.

bites-and-stings

Australian Bites and Stings

Exploring Apps

  1. GoSkyWatch is a trademark of Apple and as such are only available on iTunes. This app is essential for those nights where you are sitting around the campfire and looking up at the stars! You just point your phone to the sky and start exploring! No buttons to press or selecting modes. GoSkyWatch has a unique rotation scheme with touchless navigation, a red light mode for night vision and magnitude adjustment for great viewing conditions. Planets will show with relative brightness for easy identification, a heads-up information display and a full 180 degree display to see at a glance what is in the sky and where. If you are looking for a particular planet or star – just use the finder and let the arrow guide the way.

goskywatch

Sky Map is the Android alternative with fewer features.

  1. Spyglass is like an advanced compass/GPS Navigation App for iPhone and iPad. Spyglass can be used in the car, on a bike, in a boat, on an aircraft, or walking compass. Spyglass is essential for every traveller! Packed with so many useful tools such as a hi-tech viewfinder (HUD), compass, maps, tactical GPS, waypoint tracker, speedometer, and more! Save, track and share your position, multiple waypoints, and bearings, all in real time.

spyglass

Spyglass – iTunes

Spyglass – Android

Added extra…

The National Public Toilet Map shows the location of more than 14,000 public and private toilet facilities across Australia. This is a great App for families travelling with young children (especially when getting out the spade is not an option)

Using the Trip Planner function, you can plan your journey and locate toilets you can use along the way. The information provides location, opening hours, availability of baby change rooms, and accessibility for people with disabilities and the details of other nearby toilets.

toilet

National Public Toilet Map – iTunes

National Public Toilet Map – Android

One last thing before you go – help us by sharing to let others know who may benefit from this information!

We are about to hit the road ourselves in less than 4 weeks time – so if you can recommend any other awesome apps for travelling around Australia – add them in the comments.

Sharing is caring!

Happy travels everyone!

 

Written by: Mountain Sun Sea

Free Camp the Queensland Coast

Your Guide to Free Camping the Queensland Coast

Do you want to check out all that Queensland has to offer but you’re on a limited budget?

Avoid caravan parks that will cost you a fortune and save your dollars to allow for more activities. We have compiled a list of the best free camps along the Queensland Coast.

 

Hugh Muntz Park – Beenleigh

Situated halfway between the Gold Coast and Brisbane, Beenleigh is the perfect location to set up camp. A quick 20-minute drive along the highway and you are on the doorstep of the Theme Parks. Drive a further 20km’s down the road and you are in the heart of the Gold Coast.

Now that you’ve had a big couple of days visiting the Theme Parks, catch the train from Beenleigh Station into the beautiful city of Brisbane. Spend a relaxing day at Southbank and when you retreat back to camp later that evening, visit Yatala Pies to get dinner sorted.

Wyllie Park – Petrie
Not heading far down the road today, an hour drive to the next free camp located in Petrie. This free camp has plenty of grass and a small playground for the kids. From here, you can head into Redcliffe to have a splash in the lagoon or day trip to the Australia Zoo for some family fun.


                                                                   

Alan and June Brown Car Park – Maryborough
Conveniently located on the main street and within walking distance to the shopping centres, so park up on the bitumen and enjoy all the surrounding grass. Maryborough is an ideal base to explore Hervey Bay with it only being a 20 minute drive.


 

Sharon’s Gorge Nature Park – Sharon

The kids have had their fun at the Theme Parks, now it’s time for the adults to enjoy themselves at the Bundaberg Rum Factory. An easy 15 minute drive out of Bundaberg, you will find Sharon’s Gorge – a comfortable rest area to pull up for the night – arrive early as it gets busy!  

 

Calliope River – Gladstone
A great, quiet campground overlooking the river with clean amenities and large areas to park. Check out the sights of Gladstone or enjoy some down time with a spot of fishing.

 

Kershaw Gardens – Rockhampton

Pull into the Kershaw Gardens, a large gravel car park with beautiful surrounding gardens and directly across from a large shopping centre to stock up on supplies. From here you can head to the Rockhampton Botanical Gardens for a picnic followed by a visit to the free zoo where you will find all the animals to keep the kids entertained – monkey’s, snakes, crocodiles and plenty more. 

 

Home Hill Comfort Stop – Home Hill

A great small town that welcomes free campers by providing them with fantastic free facilities. You will feel right at home with clean toilets, hot showers, a kitchen and a Laundromat across the road. A range of activities are organised by the Bowl’s Club including budget friendly meal deals, karaoke nights etc. An ideal overnight rest area!

 

Babinda RV Rest Area – Babinda

Now we are saving the best til last, be sure to spend a couple of nights at Babinda Rest Area where you will be delighted by clean facilities, large grassed areas, drinking water and a playground for the kids. Day trip to Paronella Park, enjoy a $7 breakfast at the ‘Kool Spot Café’, visit the Babinda boulders or take a 50km drive to check out all the attractions on offer in Cairns.

Follow: The Pyke Clan to keep updated with more of the best free camps

Some great camping spots for 4×4 owners in WA

There’s nothing better than throwing the camping gear in your car and getting away from the city for a couple of days. There are so many amazing places to camp at, and you don’t have to travel for hours on end to get to them. Here are 7 fantastic camp sites near Perth, where you can literally pack on a Friday afternoon, head away and still get a great weekend in.

1. Walyunga

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Walyunga National Park is probably the closest place to Perth where you are allowed to camp in the bush. Located just one hour northeast of Perth, it’s a fantastic spot to check out. I’ve often described this place as a cross between Dwellingup and Serpentine. It has the beautiful Avon river flowing through the National park, a myriad of walking trails, BBQ and picnic facilities and most importantly, a place for you to camp!

You need to book the campsites, which you can do by ringing 9290 6100 and speaking to a ranger. The camp sites are located a few minutes drive away from the main picnic and riverside area, but are in a nice cleared section of bush.

As it is a National Park, day passes apply (unless you have an annual pass). It’s $12 per vehicle. You can find out more about these here. The Camp fees are the usual $7.50 per night.

The wildflowers are spectacular here in season, and with plenty of tracks to walk on you’ll see heaps of them. If you want to know more about the national park, you can read the full post here: Walyunga National Park.

walyunga-national-park-camping

Easy access, with fire rings available.

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Walking along the Avon River.

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Enjoy a picnic overlooking the river.

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BBQ Facilities available.

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Lots of wildflowers around in season.

2. Lane Poole Reserve

An hour and a half south of Perth lies Lane Poole Reserve, just out of Dwellingup. We’ve been going to Lane Poole Reserve every year for a long time now, and always love it. There are 10 different camp sites which vary from huge open areas to more private sites that only house two sets of campers.

The beautiful Murray River runs right through the reserve and is fantastic for swimming, canoeing, white water rafting and fishing.

Fires are permitted when the fire danger is low, and it is a brilliant spot to enjoy a good fire on a cold evening. It does get very cold in the middle of winter, so take your warm gear!

There are plenty of 4WD and mountain bike tracks in the area too.

Again, National Park and camping fee apply. The entry fee is $12 per vehicle unless you have a National Park pass. Camping fee’s range from $7.50 per night to $10, depending on where you stay.

You can read the full post here; Dwellingup. If you want to book a camp site, you can do so here.

dwellingup-murray-river

Fishing in a beautiful part of the Murray River.

murray-river-fog-at-dwellingup

Watching the fog come in on a cold winters morning.

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One of the huge open campsites on a busy weekend.

dwellingup-water-slide

Enjoying the little rock slides.

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What a magic place.

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A good campfire on a freezing night.

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Plenty of 4WD tracks around the place.

3. Waroona Dam

Lake Navarino, or Waroona Dam, has long been a popular place to camp. You can stay at the Holiday park, or take the bush camping option (which we do every time!) and stay nearer the dam itself. Both are booked through Lake Navarino Holiday Park.

Waroona Dam is pretty big, and is well known for skiing and fresh water fishing. There’s also fantastic 4WD tracks around the Dam and plenty of places to relax and soak up the scenery.

Fires are permitted in season, and the camping fees range from $12 to $17 per person per night, depending on where you camp, if its peak season and if you need power or not.

camping-at-waroona

Camping within 50 metres of the Dam.

waroona-dam-skiing

Plenty of room for water skiing and tubing.

waroona-moon-rise

When the wind dies off its a magic place.

waroona-dam-4wd-tracks

Exploring some of the 4WD tracks around the Dam.

waroona-dam-sunset

Sunset over the orange gravel is spectacular.

4. Belvidere

If coastal camping is more your thing, Belvidere is a great little spot we found a few years back. The actual campsite is a few minutes drive back from the beach, tucked in between Leschenault Inlet and Belvidere Beach. At only an hour and 40 minutes away from Perth, it’s easily doable on a Friday afternoon.

The beach here is soft, and you will need a 4WD to drive along it. It’s substantially quieter than Preston and Myalup Beach, but the fishing is just as good.

It’s a DPAW camp site, and the fees are $7.50 per person per night. There is also provision for camper trailer and caravan’s here, and the firewood is usually provided.

If you want to read the full post, you can find it here; Camping at Belvidere.

oztents-at-belvidere

Set up with the Oztents at Belvidere.

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Your typical camp site at Belvidere.

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Belvidere Beach; fishing for salmon.

salmon-fishing-at-belvidere

Lots of opportunity for good fish.

salmon-at-belvidere

We landed several nice salmon.

5. Honeymoon Pool

If you’ve ever seen the Collie River, you’d know it’s a beautiful spot to stop and soak up the scenery. Honeymoon Pool is a DPAW campsite located right on the bank of the river and is 2WD and 4WD accessible. It’s just 2 hours south of Perth and is a stunning part of the world.

The Lennard 4WD track is well worth the drive, but be aware that it does get closed once the rain hits, to avoid substantial damage to the track.

lennard-4wd-track-collie-river

Collie River just off the Lennard 4WD Track

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Amazing walks along the Collie River

Honeymoon Pool camping

You can swim, but it gets cold!

6. Martins Tank

An hour and a half south of Perth, 10 minutes drive from the coast lies Martins Tank. It’s another DPAW camp site, set amongst the peppermint trees.

This was done up in 2013 and caters for tents, caravans and camper trailers. Campfires are permitted in season, and fees are $10 per person per night.

This campsite must be booked online in advance, which you can do here.

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Enjoying our own little slice of the beach.

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Martins Tank Campsites.

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Enough shade and the usual facilities.

7. Wellington Dam

The last, but certainly not least camp site near Perth is Wellington Dam. At just over 2 hours south of Perth its a great drive to an even better location. Potters Gorge is the formal DPAW campsite, which has recently been refurbished and caters for a number of campers. This site, however, gets extremely busy very quickly.

If you have a 4WD, there are plenty of other campsites around the dam if you are prepared to do a bit of driving. Even on a popular long weekend, we had no issues finding a handful of good campsites along the banks of Wellington Dam and ended up camping in a beautiful location.

wellington-dam-camping

Could you ask for a better spot?

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We’ve had plenty of fun enjoying the 4WD tracks.

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Sunset over the dam; what a way to end the day.

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Huge tree’s rustling in the breeze.

Look after these places

It is a huge privilege being able to access these amazing camp sites. Don’t wreck them for everyone else; take your rubbish home, go to the toilets responsibly, have a fire with some common sense (when allowed) and don’t be a muppet.

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Orange, Blayney and Carcoar

Whilst free camping at the excellent Carcoar Dam site, we had lots of opportunities to visit surrounding areas by car.

Sunrise at Carcoar Dam

Orange

We did a trip down memory lane when we spent a day in Orange as both Rob and I used to live here at different stages of our childhood. We found we knew some of the same people. For example, Rob’s sister was best friends with Mariska who became my best friend for the few years I spent at Canobolas High School. Some things have changed especially in the shopping heart of Summer Street, yet the iconic lookout at Mt Canobolas is still a rough old gravel road nearly all the way to the top. The road to the summit is about 5kms. The road is sealed at the bottom and also at the top, but there is a rough unsealed gravel section for most of the way. You’d think that the local council would have done this up by now.

Lousy gravel road to Mt Canobolas

From Mt. Canobolas we made our way to Lake Canobolas, a local boating recreation area. The grounds around the lake contain lovely picnic areas, BBQ settings and children’s playgrounds. The area also contains a number of large vineyards, many of which have open cellars and few with cafes or restaurants attached. My husband was ‘shocked’ to find that I used to go skinny dipping in the lake in my tear away teenage years. LOL

Lake Canobolas

 

Carcoar

Another day we went sightseeing around the historic town of Carcoar. I quaint town that time has left behind. Sadly not much was open during the weekday we visited but we are assured it has more to offer visitors on the weekends. Anyway, we drove around and loved seeing the old architecture such as the courthouse, the railway station and of course the beautiful old churches.

Carcoar Catholic Church

 

Carcoar Anglican Church

Blayney

This was our main shopping area for our stay, so we popped in a few times, whether it be to do some actual grocery shopping, buy some excellent fish and chips, visit the op shops or do the laundry etc. We also took our time getting a good look at the historic churches here. My favourite one being this tiny church in the main street but back a little and that I think many people would miss.

Blayney Presbyterian Church

Spring Hill

One place we didn’t stop by was Spring Hill. We were returning back from Orange via a different route and it was late in the day. It looks like it is definitely worth a visit all on its own.

Spring Hill Uniting Church

 

Glorious Autumn

Being autumn at the time of our visit, the trees were putting out their most colourful display in all the towns and countryside.

Autumn colours in Blayney

Free camping in Forbes

Wheogo Park, right in the heart of Forbes is a free 48 hour campsite. It is just off the Newell Highway making it a very convenient place to spend the night on your travels through the area. It is on the southern bank of the Lachlan River as it runs through Forbes and is only about 500m from the centre of town via a walkway across the river.

Part of the view from Wheogo Park

The campsite is a large relatively flat semi grassed area with trees providing some shade if you like with a few rarer sunny spots for the solar seekers. It is large enough for big rigs. There are no amenities here other than rubbish bins but there are toilets in Lions Park which is right next door about 600m from our van. There is also good mobile phone and television reception here for both Optus and Telstra.

Camped at Wheogo Park

Take a walk around the lake, it is flat and there’s a concrete path around most of it. There’s a sports field opposite the river and there are many bridges so the walk can be tailored to suite. As I mentioned earlier, the shopping centre is just on the other side of the river so it too is within easy walking distance with IGA being conveniently the closest!

Another beautiful morning dawns at Wheogo Park

It was here that we met up with Dawn and Spencer again and later Lorraine and Steve. Rob & Spencer walked to the McFeeter’s Motor Museum and enjoyed a couple of hours there whilst Dawn and I walked into town and did mostly window shopping whilst picking up some minor supplies & checking out the local op shop I bought 5 pairs of brand new still in the package, hot pink football socks for my sock doll making! Watch and see what I make with them.

Yindi on the left wearing a dress made from a hot pink football sock

Mc Feeter’s Motor Museum is in a purpose built shed used for displaying a vast collection of meticulously restored motor cars. The cars range from vintage to custom cars and many in between, including some real odd bods! The boys really enjoyed themselves.

McFeeter’s Motor Museum

 

McFeeter’s Motor Museum

 

Free camping at Bogan Weir

The reason we went off road and thus got bogged was that we missed the driveway into the Bogan Weir. It is just 7km from Peak Hill not the 15 we had been told. (Just 150m past the causeway).

This lovely spot is so quiet (other than the birds) that I think it must be a well kept secret. We had only 4 other campers there the entire time we were there and one of those was our good friends, Steve and Lorraine.

 

 

Peak Hill

Peak Hill is just a small town many people just past on through. There is a small supermarket, and a few little cafes. We enjoyed looking at the craft shop and the ‘antique’ shop which also houses many other bits and pieces including this fabulous hand beaded sheer dress at the bargain price of $400. It would be a dress that would looked fabulous on someone like Cher.

Mostly though we were at the weir just to have some time out to veg and spend some time crafting and chatting.

 

On the way out of Peak Hill we just had to stop by the open cut Gold Mine in Peak Hill.

Beardy Creek Free Camp

Beardy Creek is approximately 8 kilomteres north of Glen Innes on the New England … It is a free camp with a forty eight hour maximum stay. (Camps Australia Wide 7 #148)

I am standing up on the track which the truckies would use.

There is plenty of room for large vans here, and it is a good spot for quick overnight on your way though to see one of the majestic national parks in the New England Region.

A beautiful rainbow embraces the motorhome

We enjoyed our friendly time in Maryvale but it was time to move on again. In keeping with our motto of taking it easy, we travelled just 200km after attending church first at Warrick. Our destination this time was at Heritage Park on Beardy Creek just north of Glen Inness.

Got to keep an eye on the rising creek levels

We generally average 80k/h but the hills slow us down significantly. Rob was very concerned about the brakes on the motorhome as they were shuddering something fierce when heavily applied. I was to drive within eyesight behind to reduce the stress on the brakes and to be within cooee if something terrible happened.

Hardly a soul in sight.

Nothing happened on the trip. The grounds are very wet and we chose not to camp at the ‘proper’ camp grounds as it was so boggy. instead we went just 50m further to what appears to be a very large truck stop. Rob reckons that not many trucks would stop there due to the approach from the road and they certainly can’t veer off the hard track. Once we had parked and settled, we enjoyed relaxing and looking out with the creek just metres away. We weren’t going to be doing much walking since there was a gently but constant drizzle of rain. We were watching the already high river to ensure that it wasn’t likely to go any higher.

Free Camping at Moura Apex River Park

The road here from Rolleston was probably the roughest Qld bitumen road we’ve encountered so far on any of our trips. We spent last night at the Dawson River Rest Area. It is a lovely spot on the banks of the river.

The rest stop is beside the highway but far enough away from the highway for its traffic not to be a problem. The town of Moura, Queensland is 7 kms away.

There’s heaps of room, nicely mown grass, hot showers, toilets and even free firewood delivered by a ranger. There is an honesty box for donations.

While maybe you’d like to catch a Barramundi which are apparently kept stocked in the river, as we’ve said before, we are not really fishermen.

Bus woes

While we were looking for a spot to camp, we noticed some serious noise coming from our gears, they were slipping. This is so serious that Rob has to investigate.

You can see the stretched chain here – it should be hanging like that!

Though there are problems to be expected from an old bus, we certainly didn’t expect to have problems with our gear chain as that was fully replaced with brand new ones that we had to have made for us in America just 14,000km ago. The bad news is that the chain has stretched. Rob doesn’t want to move on until he can do something. He decides to make a run to Bundaberg and pick up a nylon block or two to do a temporary fix.

Free camping at Babinda

Babinda has a lovely park set aside for free camping just about 60km south of Cairns. The park is on the other side of the  railway line from town but still within easy walking distance – maybe 600 metres.

 

Babinda Rest Area itself has good shade along the river though it is mostly closed off the campers now but there is still places to camp on grass or you can choose the flat gravel area above. I really recommend the gravel area in times of wet weather as it gets rather boggy on the grassy area as can be expected right next to a creek (which floods easily too!) It is a clean facility with limited covered picnic areas, toilets, hot water showers (gold coin operated) and a dump point.

The town has a couple of craft shops including a scrapbooking shop, cafes, mini supermarket, pharmacy, mechanic, pubs etc. So make use of the town as a thank you for having a free camp in the area. Without us free campers supporting the businesses, the town would suffer greatly.

We have stopped here before in 2012 and we find that it is becoming more and more popular as well as there are more and more RVs on the road now too!

Solar Power in Overcast & Wet Weather

We hit some wet weather after the rally. We are so thankful for the invention of solar panels and lithium batteries. We have set up the motorhome that we can cope power wise, with a week’s overcast weather if we are careful without resorting to shore power or using a genie (which we don’t have anyway). Click on the words: solar or lithium to go to our set upon our bus.

The induction cooker, the kettle and the microwave oven are amongst the biggest power users. Since it is overcast, it is cool enough not to need air con which is another huge poser consumer. We do need power essentially for running my CPAP machine every night and to run the regular household fridge. The LED lights run off a separate battery and use very little power anyway.

We cope easily by heating water and cooking on the butane gas cooker when it is overcast and/or the batteries are low. We’ve worked out that we use an average of 1 can of butane gas per day for our coffee, tea, cooking and just washing up once a day under these circumstances.

How do you manage in lots of wet weather?

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