Helpful tips for buying a tent

Buying a tent can be a daunting process. It isn’t easy, and it’s ideal that you do some research on what tent would best suit you before you go the store or buy it online. To make things a bit easier, Campersway has come up with some quick tips when deciding what type of tent to you and your family should go with before you camp.

How many people will be sleeping in the tent?

First things first, you need to find out how many people will be sleeping in the tent. A tents size can be quite deceiving as well, when a tent says it is a ‘four-person tent’, It means it will fit four people at a maximum. Realistically, A four-person tent can comfortably fit 2 people with beds and bags, or maybe 3. If you’re after a tent to fit a family of four, a six-person is probably the best fit. If there are any more than 4 people, you might have to look further than a six-person tent.

You need to take into consideration what you will need space for, whether it’s storage or bedding. You might think that a four-person tent looks massive when it’s empty, but once you start filling it out, you run out of room very quickly.

What conditions will the tent be used in?

Not all tents can be used in every weather condition.

For hot, summer weather, a lightweight tent with heaps of ventilation that is not designed to withhold rain and wind would be perfect. A three-season tent is perfect if you are camping in both winter and summer. It will be more likely to survivor heavier rain and winds, as well as provide protection from the cold weather.

Winter tents are not too common in Australia, as our conditions are milder in winter. But if you are planning on camping in snowy conditions, you will definitely need a winter tent – not a three season tent. Shop carefully to get the right tent to suit the weather you will be camping in.

How much will the tent weigh?

Some tents can be extremely heavy, so if you need to carry it a long distance, make sure get a smaller one.

Some of the larger tents are extremely heavy to carry, even if it’s just from the car to the campsite. Some family tents are so large when packed up in their bags, you won’t even be able to fit them on the roof racks.

So check that out before you commit to purchase. Whilst weight for car camping is not as big as a consideration as weight when you are hiking, You really need to look at your own capabilities and whether or not you will be comfortable moving that tent around.

How easy is it to set up?

How many times have you walked into a camping store, see a big, massive tent, with lots of room and storage area, and it sleeps ten people! However good this tent looks, you need to think about how long it took the camping store staff to set up.

You don’t want to spend hours on end upon arriving at a campsite on setting up a complicated tent, so you need to consider ease of setting up when selecting a tent.

Remember as well, the bigger the tent, the bigger are you will need to set it up, so make sure the area you are going to can accommodate larger tents.

Hopefully, that helps If you are looking for what tent you should buy. I would also recommend going into your local camp store and asking the staff. They know best when it comes to tents, they are the experts for a reason, and they can help select a tent personally suited to your situation.

Family Camping Checklist

Family Camping Checklist

Make sure you never leave anything off the checklist when packing to go away camping with your family with Campersway handy family camping checklist.

It can sometimes be tough trying to remember what you need to take camping when you’ve got your hand full with the rest of the family, So Campersway has made a print out list to make sure you never forget anything again.

Click here for a print out PDF Version

However, if you can’t open that, the list is below.

Campsite Gear

  • Tent, Pole, Stakes
  • Mallet
  • Cover for under your tent
  • Extra Tarp
  • Sleeping Bag
  • Sleeping Mat
  • Pillows
  • Repair Kit
  • Extra Blankets
  • Headlights and Flashlights
  • Lantern
  • Batteries
  • Shovel
  • Camp Chair

Cooking

  • Stove
  • Fuel for Stove
  • Matches or lighter
  • Firewood
  • Frying Pan
  • Pot
  • Corkscrew
  • Tablecloth
  • Roasting Sticks
  • Food Storage
  • Esky
  • Ice
  • Water Bottles
  • Plates and Utensils
  • Cups and Mugs
  • Knife and Spatula
  • Cutting Board
  • Foil
  • Soap
  • Sponge
  • Dishtowel
  • Paper Towel

Clothes

  • Clothes for Daytime
  • Sleepwear
  • Swimming Gear
  • Rainwear
  • Jacket
  • Extra layers for warmth (Thermals)
  • Gloves
  • Hats
  • Beanie
  • Socks
  • Shoes (hiking/walking shoes, easy-on shoes, water shoes)

Personal Items

  • Toothbrush
  • Insect Repellent
  • Sunscreen
  • First-aid Kit
  • Medicine
  • Toliteres
  • Toilet Paper
  • Soap
  • Towel

Other

  • Phone Charger
  • Maps
  • Garbags
  • Firestarters
  • Firewood
  • Beer and Wine

Conversation Reignites Over Uluru After Another Death

Written by avid camper – Rhys De Deugd

One of the great wonders of the world is Uluru, and for years it has been affirmed by Indigenous Australians as a sight of tradition, history, and importance, and not a rock that is to be climbed.

To the Anangu people, the sacred site has held much significance and many of the traditional owners say the rock holds many stories.

The stories are passed down generations and its sacred nature is exemplified by its beauty and importance to so many Australians.

With the recent news of a Japanese tourist dying after falling whilst climbing the rock, it has again sparked the conversation of whether the beautiful rock should be banned from climbing for safety and indigenous traditional reasons.

Northern Territory Police say the man, 76, was attempting to ascend one of the steepest parts of the climb when he collapsed and lost consciousness about 4:00 pm yesterday.

advertisement: Over 1,500 campsites Australia wide

The climb is extremely dangerous with over 37 people dying since the 1950’s when tourism began to come to central Australia.

The Anangu believe that in the beginning, the world was unformed and featureless, Uluru played a part in creating all beings and features.

Uluru is the physical evidence of the feats performed by ancestral beings during this creation time.

However, for many travellers there has been motivation to tick-off an item on their bucket list as they may not have the opportunity to achieve the feat that many other tourists have done.

Many may have climbed it but also many have lived in central Australia for thousands of years before us and are the traditional and spiritual owners of the land.

At this stage, it appears a ban will be taking place next year after the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park board decided unanimously to ban climbing Uluru.

Regardless, it is one of the true beauties of nature and is still a great tourist attraction from the bottom and the top.

Have your say below in the comments

Campersway

Killer Double Chocolate Damper Recipe

Damper cooked on an open fire isn’t food. It’s an experience! Next time you go camping, you need to remember how to make the killer double chocolate damper feast!

CHOCOLATE DAMPER
Serves 4

INGREDIENTS
– 2 cups self-raising flour
– 1 cup water
– 2 tablespoons cocoa/cacao powder (add more/less depending on how chocolatey you want it)
– 100g dark chocolate chips

 

 

METHOD
1. Combine flour and cocoa/cacao in a bowl, and stir in water with a wooden spoon, adjusting quantities until you get a doughy consistency.
2. Stir in chocolate chips, saving a small handful.
3. Knead on a floured surface until a dough ball forms, then press remaining choc chips into the top of the ball.
4. Place in camp oven, on a foil covered trivet, and cook on coals for about 10 minutes (if you have enough coals to put on the camp oven lid, this will speed up the cooking process).
5. Check and rotate camp oven if needed. When cooked it should have a slightly hardtop just like regular Damper.

To serve, cut into quarters and eat as is, no butter required; just enjoy the oozey chocolatey goodness!

Written by Ode To The Road

Australia’s Whitest Beach – Esperance WA

Cape Le Grand National Park – Esperance WA

 

We arrived in Esperance at the same time as their apparent ‘first bit of bad weather’. That did not dampen our time spent in the Cape Le Grand National Park.

The park is most well known for Australia’s whitest beaches! In the summer time, the kangaroos can be found sunbaking on the beach.

Unfortunately for us, it was not bikini weather but we were ‘lucky’ enough to see one roo on the beach. We were also ‘lucky’ enough to see a massive Sea Eagle flying overhead and a lone seal bobbing about in the bay.

 

We enjoyed fishing and playing on the beach, climbing the rock hills, climbing the summit of Frenchman Peak, a walk to Thistle Cove and short drives to Hellfire Bay and Rossiter Bay.

 

Our favourite part hands down – The Frenchman Peak. An intriguing mountain with a large cave to ‘peek’ through. The best mountain we’ve ever climbed. It wasn’t even the view from the top it was the view inside and out of the cave. We could have spent all day up there! We were lost for words. A truly unique mountain to climb at least once in your lifetime!

 

#onedayweshould #travelaustraliawithkids #caravanningwithkids #australia #travel #explore #lapofaustralia #climbingmountains #summit #frenchmanspeak #luckybay #thistlecove #rossiterbay #hellfirebay #familytime #nationalpark #westernaustralia #capelegrand

Is this Australia’s Best Caravan Park?

Our most recent stay in a caravan park was at the Big 4 Adventure Whitsunday Resort. We had seen all the spectacular photos online and knew that it was rated as one of Australia’s best caravan parks, so we had agreed months ago that it was on our ‘to visit’ list.

We arrived and it was a piece of paradise. Usually we wouldn’t consider staying in a park that was charging over $35 per night, however, this time, we made an exception. The facilities that they had to offer were well and truly worth the extra dollars.

A resort style pool with two waterslides, mini golf, tennis court, badminton, volleyball, two jumping pillows and an animal park – there was plenty to keep us all entertained. If the above facilities weren’t tempting enough, they are currently underway building one of Australia’s biggest resort water parks with 13 slides.

 

Throughout the year, school holidays or not; they run a daily activity schedule. During our 6-night stay, we had fun biscuit decorating, watched two outdoor movies and enjoyed pancakes by the pool for breakfast, all hosted by the resort.

 

Leaving the park was like having those dreaded ‘post-holiday blues’, “do we really have to leave?” is what we asked ourselves. It may not be an officially recognised term but you all know what we are talking about. Now… if that is not a true indication of how much we enjoyed our stay, from people who consider themselves to be on long term holidays; then we’re not sure what else is.

A park that caters for the whole family – we will be back!

Follow: The Pyke Clan

What is your favourite caravan park? Leave a comment below.

Glamping in the Northern Territory

What is glamping and where can do it?

Great question you may ask, glamping is forming two lifestyles together to combine the ultimate camping experience. It’s mixing the glamorous lifestyle, with camping. The cost for your standard glamping around Australia is usually about AU$150-$300 per night, however, if you head over to the Northern Territory the prices start from $1100.. What! Surrounded by the rugged wilderness of the Simpson desert, the retreat Longitude 131º is the only place in the world where you can wake up to Ayer’s Rock without even getting out of bed.

This means it would make for a perfect honeymoon destination.

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